Wednesday

0 How to Create Fonts

Have you ever wondered how you can create your own fonts? I found this tutorial with very easy steps.This is not the only way to make a hand drawn font. You can also go deeper into the FontLab Studio tutorials. But with this tutorial you will get the idea from the start to finish!


1.

The Tools I like to use India Ink and a primitive Bamboo Pens (above) to draw my characters, but you can even just use a pencil and paper if you like. You can get both the items pictured above really cheap (< $10 total) from your local art supply store or Hobby Lobby, etc.


2. Start Drawing

Take whatever tools you choose to use and start cranking out letter forms. It’s ok to mess up, just draw the letter again. But keep cranking them out until you’re happy with what you’ve got. I like to lay all of the finished ones out in front of me so I can see what I already have and what I still need. The squiggly lines are just where I got rid of some excess ink from the tip of the bamboo pen before sketching.

3. Scan next, I scan the images in at a relatively high resolution



4. Bump up the Contrast

In order to get a better final result, I adjust the contrast of the scan. I typically convert my image to grayscale, then use Levels (Control/Command + L) to make the whites whiter and the blacks blacker. Then save as a high-res jpeg.

5. Open the Scans in Illustrator

I use an “outline font editor” (FontLab Studio) which is another way to say that the final product needs to be a vector. I use Illustrator’s Live Trace to vectorize the shapes. So next, I open the jpeg scans in Illustrator.


6. Live Trace

Vectorize your image using Live Trace to get the results your happy with, then hit “Expand.” So now you have something like below.


7. Ungroup

After you Live Trace, ungroup the objects.



8. Get Rid of the White Shapes

After ungrouping I use the Magic Wand tool, and click on any of the white space in and around the letters. This selects all of the white shapes at the same time, and then I delete them.



So now all that remains is the black shapes. Notice the bounding box. There is no more whitespace around the edges compared to just after live trace above.


9. Prepare the Font Editor

It’s now time to fire up the font editor of your choice. I use FontLab Studio ($649) but it’s not the only one. TypeTool is a $99 Font Editor from the same people who make FontLab Studio. If you’re not looking for anything fancy, that’s the one I recommend (Windows, Mac), and it’s affordable compared to other products on the market. FontForge is a freeware font editor, but I believe it’s Windows only.
Depending on which editor you plan on using, the next part might be a little different than your software, but you can get the general idea, and adjust accordingly. If you use TypeTool, it should be very similar, since the software I use is from the same company.
Create a new blank font file.



Go to File > Font Info.


Fill out the information that describes your font. Family Name, Weight, Bold or not, etc. This information is important and will be embedded in the file in it’s final form.



10. Copy/Paste

Start copying/pasting your characters (paths) one-by-one from Illustrator into their corresponding slots in your font editor.


11. Adjust

Adjust Each character’s paths to your liking in the font editor. You can always go back and make adjustments if you don’t get it right the first time. And again, I can’t go too deep into this if you aren’t using FontLab Studio, but I’m sure you can find some info in your software’s help section, or google :)



Here’s a peek at what one of my completed fonts looks like in the font editor.


12. Generate Your Font

Go to File > Generate Font….



Choose your format (.ttf will work fine for both Mac and PC) and Save!


Done!

Font
http://www.bittbox.com/

About The Author

This blog was created by ELO DESIGNER to share his wealth of knowledge and researches with other designers and design lovers, to give them guidance and inspiration. Comments and suggestions are always appreciated. Thank you. Follow my daily design links on Twitter or Add me on your social network.

If you enjoyed this post, please retweet or stumble to say thanks!

Tuesday

1 44 Awesome Retro Eroctic Movie Posters From The Past

There was a time when Erotic Movie Posters were very innocent. From the typography treatment, to the retro style. And nothing could be too revealing or too explicit. I collected some posters that I think could at least provide some artistc value to it. - Enjoy

30's

16are_you_fit_to_marry02_600
17are_you_fit_to_marry_600
18combo_eat_em_alive_poster_01_600
19elysia_valley_of_the_nude-_poster_01_600
20elysia_valley_of_the_nude-_poster_02_600
21she_devil_island_poster_01_600
22she_devil_island_poster_02_600
23this_nude_world_poster_01_600
24this_nude_world_poster_02_600
25this_nude_world_poster_03_600
26this_nude_world_poster_04_600
27wild_women_of_borneo_poster_01_600
28wild_women_of_borneo_poster_02_600


40’s

14hollywood_burlesque_600
15hollywood_revels_600

50’s

1should_a_girl_say_yes
2beast_with_1000000_eyes_600
3ding_dong_girlies_600
4garden_of_eden1_600
5immoral_mr_teas01_600
6immoral_mr_teas02_600
7immoral_mr_teas03_600
8naughty_new_orleans01_600
9naughty_new_orleans02_600
10naked_venus_600
11scandal_inc_600
12strip_tease_murder_case_600
13womens_prison_600

60’s

29ero60
31ero603
32ero604
33ero605
34ero606
35ero607
36ero609
37ero6010
38ero6011
39ero6012
40ero6013
41ero6014
42ero6015
43ero6016
44ero608
45ero6017
About The Author

This blog was created by ELO DESIGNER to share his wealth of knowledge and researches with other designers and design lovers, to give them guidance and inspiration. Comments and suggestions are always appreciated. Thank you. Follow my daily design links on Twitter or Add me on your social network.

If you enjoyed this post, please retweet or stumble to say thanks!