Friday

13 Best Creative Collection Of Hotel Logo Designs

For Restaurants and Hotels logo design is too important which makes the consumers love them. Because a logo performs a big aspect in the growth of the company the hotel have to find a well designed logo to impress consumers. Here are Creative Collection Of Hotel Logo Design that you might find inspiring. We hope you will enjoy this wonderful Showcase.

Avion Hotel

hotel logo design

MINA A’ SALAM

hotel logo design

Hotel Patrol

hotel logo design

Ukrainian Hotel Management

hotel logo design

Hotel Cargo

hotel logo design

Hotels 5 stars

hotel logo design

Exotica Hotel

hotel logo design

Hotel Complectation

hotel logo design

Roadstar Hotel

hotel logo design

Enjoy Hotel Management

hotel logo design

hotel geetanjali

hotel logo design

Nigerian hotels directory

hotel logo design

RoyalHotel

hotel logo design

Hotel

hotel logo design

home forest

hotel logo design

HotelBook

hotel logo design

Pousada Portal do Mar

hotel logo design

The Boat Shed

hotel logo design

Iphotel

hotel logo design

Louren Hotel

hotel logo design

hotel

hotel logo design

Hotel Llundudno

hotel logo design

About The Author

This blog was created by ELO DESIGNER to share his wealth of knowledge and researches with other designers and design lovers, to give them guidance and inspiration. Comments and suggestions are always appreciated. Thank you. Follow my daily design links on Twitter or Add me on your social network.

If you enjoyed this post, please retweet or stumble to say thanks!

Thursday

13 10 Common Typography Mistakes You Should Know

The goal of this post is to help designers and clients understand the importance of good type skills, while avoiding some of the common mistakes. Please keep in mind that most of these mistakes are subjective and can be changed varying on the project, goals or circumstances.

Below is a list of 10 common mistakes used in type design/layout that can make a large impact in the effectiveness and appearance of your designs, in addition to saving you time and money when dealing with printers.

1. Not enough leading

Leading/linespacing can improve the overall readability of large blocks of text on a page, making it easier on readers to follow lines of text without losing their place. Too little can cause a cramped feeling. It’s important to remember that different fonts need different linespacing. Varying heights in letterforms may demand more or less.

2. Not enough tracking

Tracking/letterspacing is applied to a group of letters. It prevents letters from running into each other, especially during print. It’s similar to leading in which it can improve or hinder readability, flow of text and the density/weight of a block of text.

3. Getting tracking confused with kerning

While tracking is applied to a group of characters, kerning is the adjustment of space between two letter pairs. Effective for use with headlines, text with ALL CAPS and logo treatments (it helps with readability at various sizes). Don’t fall into the trap of letting your design software set this by default; it’s character specific. Same applies to the above, #1 & 2.

4. Lengthy lines of text

Reading many long lines of type causes eye fatigue. Readers are forced to moves their heads and eyes more often from one line to the next. Various sources I’ve researched state to keep lines of text under 50 – 60 characters long.

5. Mixing too many typefaces and weights

Too many typefaces on one page can become distracting and disconnecting (lacking unity). Try keeping your fonts choices to three or less per project. Too many weights can cause a reader to be unclear where important elements are on a page. This creates the possibility of the reader missing something important.

6. Not using serifs for lengthy-text material

Serifs are known to make reading lengthy material, such as books and magazines, more sustainable for longer periods of time. It also helps with eye strain/fatigue, and we all know that we need our eyes! Although this can be argued, serifs seem to sit better on the baseline.

7. Printing similar values of color on top of each other

For example, try printing a medium blue text on top of a medium brown box. Not only is it unappealing, but it makes it hard on the eyes. Also creates a muddy effect.

8. Reversed out text on less than 50% tints

Much like the above, this also increases eye strain and hinders readability. The words get lost in the background and typically prints less visible than seen on screen. This will save you time, money and Asprin for your printing headaches.

9. Overusing centered text

Using centered text creates a jagged and broken appearance to text — very disconnecting! Can be viewed as amateurish in most instances. Save it for those wedding invitations.

10. Large body copy

Normally, designers and non-designers (and yes, I did it too!) will immediately use a 12 point font for body copy. Smaller (even slightly smaller) fonts sizes creates a more professional, modern look. Large body copy can be clunky — think about the font size of a children’s book. Clunky right?… unless it’s the look your going for.

It’s also important to note that viewing text on a computer monitor is much different than printing it. In most instances, type on a screen appears smaller and less crisp. Also, most printers will advise you not to use font sizes under 7 points. May result in readability issues.

11. Not knowing what the Grid System is

Being a typography enthusiast, understanding the grid has become one of the best things I’ve learned in design to date. It’s the basis for creating clarity and making your type and layouts more cohesive. Check out the new site, The Grid System, for links and resources pertaining to grid systems.


About The Author

This blog was created by ELO DESIGNER to share his wealth of knowledge and researches with other designers and design lovers, to give them guidance and inspiration. Comments and suggestions are always appreciated. Thank you. Follow my daily design links on Twitter or Add me on your social network.

If you enjoyed this post, please retweet or stumble to say thanks!

Wednesday

1 Best Useful Design Resources You Will Ever Need

I’ve searched my bookmarks and gathered your top tips, culminating in this selection of sites, books, articles and designers.


Type foundries

Arnhem typeface

  • Hoefler & Frere-Jones, H&FJ works with brand leaders in every sector, developing original typefaces and licensing fonts from its library of nearly 1,000 designs
  • Porchez Typofonderie, an independent digital type foundry in France, designing, manufacturing and selling high quality typefaces
  • OurType, founded in 2002, OurType is managed by three partners: Fred Smeijers, Corina Cotorobai and Rudy Geeraerts
  • Village, the union of eleven young type foundries who have decided to go it alone, together
  • P22, creates computer typefaces inspired by art, history, and sometimes science
  • FontShop, around for 16 years, since the dawn of digital type
  • Process Type Foundry, from a studio in Golden Valley, Minnesota
  • Colophon, set-up by Brighton-based studio Entente
  • Type foundries worth a look, a slightly larger resource, with commentator recommendations, too

Books

Logo by Michael Evamy

Catch a few more recommended reads here: A few good books.

Logo history

logo design history

Trends

logo design trends leaf

“Logo trends” is a bit of an oxymoron. Granted, a logo should live and grow with a brand, but it shouldn’t adhere to the latest, greatest fads. Because of which I don’t much like these trend features, but I know they prove popular, so here you are.

Articles

logo notions

Design agencies

Pentagram

Independent identity designers

Andrew Sabatier

Awards

OK logo design

Blogs

logolog

Illustrator tutorials

Adobe Illustrator

Showcases

Mexico 70 logo

Style guides and manuals

E4 logo

Further resources

La Logotheque

Hopefully that’ll keep you occupied for a while. If you know of any more design resources, do let me know.

About The Author

This blog was created by ELO DESIGNER to share his wealth of knowledge and researches with other designers and design lovers, to give them guidance and inspiration. Comments and suggestions are always appreciated. Thank you. Follow my daily design links on Twitter or Add me on your social network.

If you enjoyed this post, please retweet or stumble to say thanks!